Monday, 10 September 2012
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I am a young 41.9 years and have recently been diagnosed with Bi-lateral Femoral Acetabular Impingement (FAI) and Osteoarthritis of both hips and strongly advised by my doctor to cease hard training IMMEDIATELY if I want to avoid double hip-replacements within 1 to 2 years. Needless to say after 12 years of practise this has come as a bit of a shock to me as I thought I had a strained groin muscle that would just not heal. After extensive research and soul-searching I have decided to look at Tai Chi, swimming etc and would like to know what other people in this situation have chosen to do.

more than a month ago
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#66
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If your putting strain on your hips doing Tai Chi your doing it wrong, the whole point is that you use your muscles not your joints, yes your joints move but should be relaxed and free. I have taught Tai Chi for over 22years (trained in Malaysia and China) and many of my students are elderly with hip replacements and problems and they find Tai Chi invaluable to increase movability and strength. Tai Chi is first and foremost about leg strength then you can look at relaxing etc..
more than a month ago
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#65
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Arthritis is a *******, to be direct. I've found Tai Chi to actually be surprisingly hard on the hip joints, lots of deep and rocking movement, and some yoga also not good. Swimming is excellent because the motion is more linear than circular. I have some contacts who know lots more about this stuff, will see what I can find out.
more than a month ago
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#63
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Swimming is a fantastic idea. Use it to focus on rehabilitation of your hips. I think Tai Chi would not be a very suitable rehabilitation for you to start out with. Tai CHi has a very strong emphasis on stances and slow movement that relies very heavily on hip strength and core strength. It would most definitely put a strain on your hips despite the low impact movements. (Depending on the style of Tai Chi I suppose) Just a thought, but if you could do water Tai Chi, that may help alleviate the stress on your hips a little. As you train and get stronger, you can move on to Tai Chi out of the pool. Just take it very slow and consult your doctor about the benefits of that type of physical activity. Win win. Rehab and Martial Arts. :D
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